Shuffling Towards the Weekend!

|

shuffle.jpgFor this week’s edition of our beloved Friday shuffle, we had a very special guest, Mr. Chuck Klosterman, submit the contents of his iPod for our scrutiny and judgement. Chuck was a senior editor at Spin magazine whose work now appears regularly in several other major publications, and is also the best-selling author of four books of whip-smart pop culture essays, the latest of which (referentially entitled IV) went onsale last week. A man whose insight managed to turn something as seemingly irrelevant as Saved By the Bell into a generation-defining cultural touchstone, Chuck has earned himself a devoted following (including The OC’s Seth Cohen, who name-checked him on the show) and critical acclaim. We strongly suggest you pick up IV, as well as Chuck’s three previous books, all of which are available here. And now without further ado, the first five resulting songs of his shuffle with Chuck’s thoughts about each one. Leave your own shuffle in the comments!

“In the Meantime”, Spacehog: The music of Spacehog reflects a very specific period of modern rock culture, which was the period when bands thought singing like David Bowie and Axl Rose at the same time was a good idea.

“Danko/Manuel”, Drive-By Truckers: This is a depressing song about dying and being sweaty.

“Hot and Nasty (live)”, Black Oak Arkansas: The intro to this track demands that the audience “hunch down” so that they can “know what it’s all about.” Perhaps Lil’ Kim listens to this shit. I suppose this qualifies as “boogie rock,” which is a stupid phrase but a very good genre.

“Chloe Dancer/Crown of Thorns”
, Mother Love Bone: It’s been awhile since I’ve watched “Singles” or died from an heroin overdose. If I were a city planner in Seattle, I would ride the monorail before playing this song at my wedding.

“Free Tyson Free!”, Holy Gang: This is a 1995 industrial anthem about (a.) how Mike Tyson was wrongly convicted of rape and (b.) how he was destined to return from prison and regain his title. I guess Roadrunner Records didn’t employ a lot of futurists during this era. I love this song, though. It makes me want to punch a horse.