Matched

by (@shalapitcher)

Reached, Crewel: Two Fearless Heroines I’m Thankful For, A VH1 Celebrity Thanksgiving

Reached by Ally Condie and Crewel by Gennifer Albin

OK, sure, I’m thankful for my (growing) family, food on the table and all that this Thanksgiving, but it ain’t my job to talk about those things here at VH1 Celebrity, so I get to skip to the lighter stuff and tell you that this year, I’m thankful for the heroines. Specifically, the heroines of a number of young adult novels I’ve been digging into this fall, and who, despite being teens in alternate universes, still manage to inspire this crusty old lady with their ability to rise above dreary circumstances with nothing but their wits. There are a whole lot of them, but I’ll narrow it down to the protagonists of two books that came out in the past month: Cassia, the heroine of Reached, the conclusion to Ally Condie’s Matched trilogy; and Adelice, the girl at the center of Gennifer Albin’s Crewel.

After saying goodbye to Twilight, and looking at a long wait for the next Hunger Games movie, I think we’re pretty lucky that there’s been a steady flow of other fantastic girls like Bella and Katniss jumping out of their pages. Not that I’d lump them all together, though. Cassia is unlike any others you’ve met: She began Matched perfectly content with the dystopian Society that dictated everything in her life from what she ate every meal to whom she’d married. And at first, it wasn’t any sort of mortal danger that woke her up from that illusion, it was a poem. As we’ve followe Cassia’s journey out of society, into the wilderness to follow her exiled love Ky (in book 2, Crossed) and back to work under cover for the rebellion in Reached, we see her grow brave and confident. We also see her become an artist in her own right, writing poems in a world finally realizing that 100 carefully selected classics aren’t enough. And then, strangely enough for such an entertaining book, it is actually Cassia’s skills as a statistician (or “Sorter” as they’re called) that proves to be what turns her into a hero for thousands. A girl who saves the day with math and literature? Yes, I think we could use a few more of those. Read more…

by (@shalapitcher)

Twilight‘s Ending! Here Are 20 Things To Fill That Hole In Your Heart

Pretty Little Liars, Beautiful Creatures, The Mortal Instruments, Team Starkid and other things to obsess over now that Twilight is ending.

We’re shocked that Summit Entertainment and Stephenie Meyer have yet to announce some kind of detox program to help those of us who’ve spent up to seven years addicted to the Twilight books and movies. Aren’t they worried about the withdrawal we’ll all experience once we’ve seen Breaking Dawn – Part 2 a few times and have no more Edward and Bella to look forward to? Well, not to suggest that there is anything that can replace Forks and the Cullens in your heart, but we have a few new obsessions you might consider taking up. Which you choose all depends on why you became a Twi-crack addict in the first place. Read on and then suggest your own!

If you love Twilight because of …

… its star-crossed lovers plot, you’ll love:

Warm Bodies, the novel by Isaac Marion and upcoming Summit movie starring Nicholas Hoult. Zombie R is a very different kind of undead than Edward, but his doomed love for Julie is just as epic and possibly world-changing. Dive into the book now and then look forward to the flick in February 2013.

The Hush Hush saga, by Becca Fitzpatrick. Nora Grey doesn’t know why she’s drawn to Patch her dangerous new biology lab partner… oh, sound familiar? Don’t worry, this is no knock off. Fitzpatrick has woven a very complex mythology around deadly angels and their offspring that will infuriate you with its addictive quality.

Daughter of Smoke and Bone, by Laini Taylor. Speaking of complex new mythology, don’t even ask us to explain the plot of this trilogy. Let us tell you that book one was one of the most breathtakingly beautiful reads of 2011 — there are angels, beastly creatures, exotic tooth poachers, ballet-dancing puppets and a love story that rivals Romeo and Juliet in its devastating nature.

… its gut-wrenching love triangle, you’ll love: Read more…

by (@shalapitcher)

Ray Bradbury R.I.P.: 5 Pop-Culture Things We Owe To The Sci-Fi Dystopian Forefather

Ray Bradbury

Author and screenwriter Ray Bradbury passed away last night at the age of 91, and he’ll be missed for a whole lot more than just those books on your high school reading list. Today, as you head into the theaters to see The Hunger Games and Prometheus, stroll down you bookstore aisle to pick up the latest hot dystopian YA novel, or flip on your ginormous flat-screen TV, you owe something to Bradbury. As much as we refer to George Orwell’s Big Brother of 1984, rail against the dangers of Aldous Huxley‘s Brave New World and conjure up nightmares of Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, those book-burning “firefighters” of Fahrenheit 451 strikes fear into the hearts of many a reader and writer. His sci-fi writing (in short stories, The Ray Bradbury Theater TV show, and elsewhere), has also inspired many too follow in his imaginative footsteps. Granted we haven’t read his books since high school, so here, based largely on educated guesses and wild speculation, are 5 pop-culture things we owe the guy:

The Hunger Games

1. The Hunger Games: Fahrenheit 451 starkly contrasts the sterile, overstimulated emptiness of the dystopian city with the romanticized beauty of the country. Sound familiar?
Read more…