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Lindsay Lohan Wants To Play Manson Victim Sharon Tate

Lindsay Lohan is continuing her quest to play a tragic Hollywood figure, since she lost the role of Linda Lovelace as a result of her legal troubles. It’s now being reported that Lohan was offered the role of Sharon Tate in an upcoming Charles Manson biopic called Eyes Of A Dreamer. Tate, who was married to Roman Polanski, was brutally murdered in 1969 by members of the Manson family, and this new film plans to show incredibly graphic portrayals of the Manson murders.

Photographer Tyler Shields, who you may remember from such work as Pervy Kristin Cavallari Photo Shoot and Naughty Glee Photo Shoot, is going to play Manson as well as direct the film. Shields says that he has discussed the film with Lohan and says “She asked me about [Eyes] … And I said, ‘Oh you should be Sharon Tate.’ And she was like, ‘That would be amazing.’” Her participation just depends on whether or not she’s incarcerated or not at the time of shooting. Lohan has a court date at the end of April which will determine whether or not she’ll go to jail over the theft of a necklace.

[Photos: Getty Images]

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Flashback Lunch: Charles Manson Ages Gracefully

The LA police have released a new photo of Charles Manson, almost 40 years after his followers committed a series of brutal murders in Hollywood, including that of Sharon Tate, Roman Polanski‘s pregnant wife. Manson has been denied parole eleven times since 1978. His next hearing will be in 2012.

Check out the gallery for photos of Manson throughout his decades in prison, as well as links to his famous TV interviews.

Related Scandalist Content: Charles Manson Murders (The 100 Greatest Celebrity Scandals Of All Time)

View Photo Gallery

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#6: Charles Manson Murders

The hippie dream received a rude awakening in 1969 when Charles Manson, a failed musician, used psychedelics and “free love” (orgies, rape, that kind of thing) to transform a group of troubled, vulnerable young adults into a violent, psychotic “family.” His efforts eventually led to a series of grotesque murders in August 1969 (slogans like “DEATH TO PIGS” and “RISE” were written on the walls in blood) that horrified residents of the hills outside LA and stumped police for months.

Manson, in and out of jail for assault and robbery since the age of nine, prophesized that an apocalyptic battle between the races would end with Manson ruling the black populace as the new Jesus Christ alongside his fellow angels, The Beatles (who had not been informed of these plans). Anxious to get things started, he ordered members of his cult to massacre rich white Californians, hoping police would blame African-Americans for the crimes. Sharon Tate, the pregnant wife of director Roman Polanski, and celebrity hair stylist Jay Sebring (the inspiration for Warren Beatty’s Shampoo) were among those stabbed and shot by Manson’s clan. Thanks to a series of bureaucratic blunders (the gun was found and given to the police months before it was connected the murders), the LAPD did not arrest Manson and his followers until December.

The court case (highlighted by frequent disruptions, shaved heads and self-inflicted forehead scars) was prosecuted by Vincent Bugliosi, whose account, Helter Skelter, was an instant best seller and the basis of two TV movies. Imprisoned for life and still awaiting the apocalypse, Manson remains a ’60s anti-hero for young transgressives. Not that he’s happy about it: “Being crazy meant something [in the '60s], he said. “Nowadays, everybody’s crazy.”