10 Crucial Moments In Deep Purple History

by (@BHSmithNYC)

Deep Purple crucial moments

Creators of hard rock’s most recognizable riff, home to some of the best musicians to ever plug into a Marshall stack, Deep Purple are just as important to the development of early heavy metal as their more hallowed brethren Black Sabbath and Led Zeppelin. Like the high speed race cars they sonically emulated, their various lineups are known to fans as Mark I, Mark II and Mark III, but the core through their golden epoch was drumming powerhouse Ian Paice, groundbreaking organist Jon Lord and tempestuous sorcerer of the Stratocaster, Ritchie Blackmore. Members went on to serve in such esteemed outfits as Rainbow, Whitesnake, Captain Beyond, Black Country Communion and even the mighty Sabbath but it’s records like In Rock and Machine Head that place them in the ranks of rock’s greatest bands. These are the 10 Most Crucial Moments In Deep Purple History.

Watch the all-new episode of Behind The Music Remastered: Deep Purple on VH1 Classic, premiering this Saturday, April 27 at 9P/8C.

10

10. “Hush” single
Originally written by Joe South for American singer Billy Joe Royal, this 1968 cover was Deep Purple’s first hit record and the high water mark of their Mk I line-up. Initially envisioned as the “British version of Vanilla Fudge,” the band’s first three albums failed to take off, artistically or commercially, and when Blackmore and Lord wanted to get heavier, original singer Rod Evans and bassist Nick Simper were sent packing.

9

9. The World’s Loudest Band
Many groups claim or have been proclaimed to be the “Loudest Band In The World” but Deep Purple were the first to be awarded the dubious honor in 1972 by the Guinness Book of World Records.  A concert at London’s Rainbow Theater was clocked at 117 decibels, loud enough to “render three members of their audience unconscious. “ Unfortunately the record wouldn’t stand, being blown away a mere three years later by The Who and is currently held by metal warriors Manowar.

related stories
you might like
Powered By Zergnet