Here’s To My Sweet Satan: The 15 Creepiest Backwards Messages In Classic Rock

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Rock ‘n’ roll originally had a reputation as “the devil’s music,” but these folks took it a little too literally! Since the late ’60s, rumors have run rampant that famous bands are hiding secret Satanic messages in their music, played backward so it can sneak into our subconscious mind unnoticed! From classic groups like the Beatles and Led Zeppelinthrough to the metal boom of the ’80s and even to today, the stories are endless! Sometimes it’s clearly unintentional, and occasionally musicians are just having a bit of fun at the expense of their fans. But then sometimes, the words are a little too clear…It’s spooky!

Is there some truth to these mysterious messages, or do some people just have way too much free time on their hands. Read on, give a listen, and decide for yourself!

15. “Another One Bites The Dust” by Queen (1980)

We’ll start off with one that isn’t too scary (unless you have asthma or something). Evangelical Christian groups were convinced that Freddie Mercury‘s scat vocal breakdown at the end of the song sounded like ”It’s fun to smoke marijuana” when played in reverse. We have to admit, it  does sound pretty similar. It’s interesting to note that a decent number of backwards masking tends to revolve around weed, which is probably what inspired folks to play the record backwards in the first place.

 

14. “Hotel California” by the Eagles (1976)
It’s an ode to the sinister-yet-seductive draw of Hollywood, but some lyrics might hint at an even darker power. If you listen to the opening verse backwards, you might be able to make out words that sound spookily like “Yes, Satan organized his own religion,” and other messages from the Devil. And if you play it forward you get something even more terrifying: An Eagles song.

 

13. “Nightmare/The Dream Time” by Motorhead (1991)
It’s pretty hard to miss the long-winded battle cry in this track. “Now tell me about your miserable little lives. I do not subscribe to your superstitious, narrow minded flights of paranoia. I and people like me, will always prevail! You will never stifle our free speech in any country in the world, ‘coz we will fight forever.” The album was released on the heals of the Motorhead’s multi-year legal battle with their record company, but there are some who say that this was the band’s message to the censor-happy Parents Resource Music Center (PRMC).