Shine On: The 10 Best Rick Wright Pink Floyd Songs

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With the forthcoming release of Pink Floyd’s The Endless River, a collection of posthumous recordings with late keyboardist Richard Wright during sessions for 1994’s The Division Bell, it got us thinking of all the fantastic material that the founding Floyd member wrote or co-wrote during his time with the legendary band.

The mega-talented Rick Wright is of course less well known than David Gilmour, Roger Waters and Syd Barrett, mostly due to his quiet and unassuming nature in the midst of all the other oversized talents and egos within Pink Floyd. But Floyd fans have long touted the singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist’s underrated musical abilities and overall contribution to the band, and rightly so. Wright is responsible, at least in part, for some of the band’s most famous songs, along with a lot of other lesser-known yet highly respected material that has helped shape Floyd’s signature sound and musical legacy. From “Us and Them” to “Summer ’68,” “Time” to “See-Saw,” Wright’s soulful vocals and richly textured keyboard sounds are found throughout the progressive rock band’s classic albums. Here are the 10 Best Rick Wright Pink Floyd songs. Though he passed away in 2008, his incredible talent, spirit and contribution to the music world lives on.


10. “Remember a Day”
This haunting ode to childhood comes off of the band’s 1968 album, A Saucerful of Secrets. Written and sung by Wright and featuring melancholic piano and organ, it was performed live only twice – as an encore to a show in 1968, and in September 2008 when David Gilmour performed the song on Later… with Jools Holland as a tribute to Wright (who had died a week earlier).


9. “Paint Box”
The B-side to the 1967 single “Apples and Oranges,” this psychedelic pop song was written and sung by Wright and features angst-ridden, anti-social lyrics as well as a fantastic yet eerie piano solo.