Is Avril Lavigne Too Sexy For Malaysia?

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Will Avril Lavigne get to sex up Malaysia? On Thursday concert organizers will meet with ministry officials, who decided the planned date for her performance (August 29th) was too close the country’s independence day. Earlier, politicians complained that Lavigne’s act was “too sexy,” what with all the bare armpits and hopping.

For the rest of this post and great Avril picks, go to Scandalist.

Check out Avril videos, photos, tour dates, and news.

Madonna Turns 50!!!

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Sure, it’s debatable whether Madonna still has that same provocative firepower she had back when she was in her prime. But let’s face it, there still lots of zingggg coming from the old girl. “If it’s against the law, arrest me/if you can handle it, undress me,” she coos while writhing and prancing in the recent video for Hard Candy‘s “Give It 2 Me.” Lots of people probably, you know, actually couldn’t handle it. So hats off, Madge. We love you for the scandals you generate, the great poetry you inspire, and the music you make. We even love you because you deny reality. Happy Birthday!

Watch Madonna videos, and read about her 10 most overlooked songs.

Alanis Morissette’s “You Oughta Know” Anger Object is Joey From “Full House”

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The object of Alanis Morissette‘s angst in her hit song “You Oughta Know” is none other than Joey from Full House. In an interview with the Calgary Herald, Dave Coulier admits he is the muse for the angry break-up song. The actor, best known for his role as the BFF of the father of Michelle Tanner (played by baby Olsen twins Mary-Kate and Ashley) who comes to help raise her on the TV series, said he first heard the song while driving.

“I said, ‘Wow, this girl is angry.’”

For the full story, go to Scandalist.

Alanis gets mad and swears in her songs. Read our list of Rock’s Most Foul Mouths.

Staind Plays Acoustic In Our Office!

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If you’re looking for post-grunge melancholy at its most passionate, you need to get with Staind. Aaron Lewis and the guys are all about drilling down into the emotions at hand, and growling their way toward some kind of transcendence. You can hear it all over their new disc, The Illusion of Progress, which we’re streaming in its entirety this week.

And you can even hear it in the acoustic session the band recently did in our New York offices. Above, you can watch ‘em move through the classic “It’s Been Awhile,” as well as new tunes “Believe” and “Pardon Me.”

To hear Staind’s earlier music, head to Rhapsody.

John Loves Pete, Pete Loves Kanye, Kanye Loves…

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Pete loves John. John loves Kanye. Pete loves Kanye. John loves Pete. Over at Scandalist, they’re crowning a new group of hyper-obnoxious oversharers. The mutual appreciation society that is John Mayer, Pete Wentz and Kanye West will henceforth be known as the Blog Hogs — like the Rat Pack with less talent. Or the Frat Pack without Will Ferrell.

Read the rest of the post and see photos at Scandalist.

From Cypress Hill to De La Soul, Hip Hop Honors 2008 Celebrates Old School Heroes

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Roll through hip hop’s old school and you quickly get goosebumps: the array of innovative artists that helped establish the music is daunting. Our annual salute to the masters who gave rap its early achievements has become a great tradition. This year, VH1′s Hip Hop Honors is saluting five wildly creative acts, Cypress Hill, De La Soul, Naughty By Nature, Slick Rick, and Too $hort. Each brought a wealth of ideas to the table, guiding the music to the next level.

The show is hosted by Tracy Morgan. It premieres on October 7 on VH1.

Watch videos by all the honorees!

Cypress Hill

“Hummin’, comin’ atcha…” B Real and his buds Sen Dog and DJ Muggs put asses in gear and had dudes glancing over their shoulders when they busted out of L.A. in 1991 with a wildly aggressive debut. They were weed-smoking bangers who loved all sorts of funk. Sometimes rapping in Spanglish, sometimes letting their anger dominate, and always explaining their frustrations, they made tracks like “How I Could Just Kill a Man” sound like chilling reports from the ‘hood.

Slick Rick

A Brit raised in the Bronx, Slick Rick had MCs all around him during his teenage years. He’d bang beats on the school desks and freestyle through the afternoons. The borough was rap’s Mesopotamia, of course, and superhero Doug E Fresh help Rick get a leg up. Almost instantly the party people were constantly shouting one of his improvised refrains. Hip-hop, most assuredly, would be a lesser place without “La Di Da Di.” Turns out the MC had compelling way with a narrative, too, and “Children’s Story, from 1988′s The Great Adventures of Slick Rick is one of rap’s masterpieces.

De La Soul

If everyone’s zigging, maybe it’s best to zag. De La Soul’s 3 Feet High and Rising sounded like nothing hip-hop had heard before when the Long Island trio dropped it in 1989. Nothing. If rap had fashioned itself into a music that was perpetually hard, Trugoy the Dove, Posdnuos, and Pacemaster Mase came on like flower children. Indeed, with their iconoclastic debut declared hip-hop’s “daisy age” to be in full effect. Oddball samples, unusual flow, giddy subject matter – the guys brought a sense of frolic to the foreground, and it was utterly refreshing.

Naughty By Nature

They took a Jackson 5 sample, turned it inside out, layered some glib sex talk on top, and came up with one of hip hop’s catchiest tracks, 1991′s “O.P.P.” Three Jersey kids – Treach, Vinnie, and Kay Gee – knew how to make party music, no question. They came up under Queen Latifah, and in no time had New York bobbing its head to some dope beats. There was a tough side to the Naughty boys, but by the time they dropped “Hip Hop Hooray,” everyone knew they destined to celebrate, not intimidate.

Too $hort

“I met another girl/her name was Ann/all she wanted was to freak with a man/when i met Ann, I shook her hand/we ended up freaking by a garbage can.” Too $hort was just telling it like it was when stepped out of Oakland onto the national scene in 1987. He let everyone know he was born to mack, and his rhymes were filled with the action of dope fiends, sex freaks, and pimp problems. Radically stark, the music behind his performances was woozy and ominous. But something about it was addictive, and it remains so to this day.