by (@unclegrambo)

Why Is The “Monster Mash” Still Such A Big Seller After 50 Years?

Fifty years ago this week, an aspiring actor turned songwriter named Bobby Pickett reached the top of the Billboard charts under the moniker Bobby “Boris” Pickett and the Crypt-Kickers with his song, “Monster Mash.” The novelty track spent two weeks at #1 on the charts in October of 1962 and, to this day, displays remarkable staying power: A quick look at the iTunes Singles chart this morning shows the track sitting in the #40 position, likely being purchased by children whose parents were not even alive when the song was first written during the music industry’s dance craze phase of the early 60s (think “The Twist,” think “The Mashed Potato,” think “The Loco-Motion”).

S-Curve Records founder Steve Greenberg penned a fascinating tribute to the “Monster Mash” on his record company’s website this morning, and it got us thinking a bit. Why is a song that is 50 years-old, written as a parody of (if you’re generous) or a cash-in on (if you’re more cynical) a long-forgotten dance craze, and pegged to an (admittedly awesome) impression of a film star who rose to fame in the 1930s still relevant to today’s youth?

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