by (@raevotta)

Theo Katzman Haunts His Ex Through Advertisements in “Hard For You” Video

The curse of dating a musician is he or she might write a less-than-flattering song about you, but in the universe of Theo Katzman‘s latest video for “Hard For You” the Brooklyn-based performer whose sound is best described as a blend of indie and soul takes the threat just a step further, imaging a world where the uber-sucessful musician stalks his ex through the inescapable landscape of ever-present advertisements.

“The song was inspired by the idea of my girlfriend leaving me for a guy who makes more money, who seems more professional, who has his life together more than I do,” explained Katzman, who was formerly part of the dance-oriented band My Dear Disco. “In the song, I explain how, while this other guy may have his job and his money, I’m the guy with the soul. I’m the guy with the music.”

by (@raevotta)

Charlene Kaye Is A ‘Ballsy’ Rock Goddess In ‘Forever Is A Long Time’ (VIDEO)

Charlene Kaye‘s music is at once classic and contemporary, a mix of glam rock and classical music in just the right measures.  In her new video for “Forever Is A Long Time,” she takes a darker turn.

“I wanted do a ballsy rock video, something that would really capture the chaos and panic of the song,” Kaye explained to VH1. “Liam (White, the video’s director) got a bunch of public access footage and projected it over us, and if you look closely you can see that there are two narratives going on- one of the past, and of the present, which is something I think is really beautiful and relevant to the song. The shots range from bombs raining down during WWII to old circus acts in the 1920s to the Hindenberg exploding, so there’s no lack of things to look at!”

“Forever Is A Long Time” is the third song off her most recent, Kickstarter-funded album, Animal Love, to get a music video, and is definitely less sunshine and hope than Kaye’s previous tracks.

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CONCERT REVIEW: 3,500 StarKid Superfans (And Our Reviewer) Pack A Sold-Out Roseland Ballroom

Shortly after Charlene Kaye took the stage as the opening act of StarKid‘s performance at Roseland Ballroom on Sunday evening —the final date of their “Apocalyptour”— she addressed her audience of 3,500. “It’s the end of the world,” she told them. “And you get to experience it with us.” The crowd erupted as Kaye continued playing her 45-minute set, a loud and buoyant assortment of songs that showcased her powerful voice and magnetic stage presence. Apart from a poorly conceived request for her audience to kneel down and jump in unison (an act that seemed to cause more disgruntlement than enjoyment), she held a tight grip on the crowd. Her set ended with “Animal Love I,” an electrifying anthem (and the best song of the entire evening) that seemed fitting for a theater of people who had been told to expect end of the world.

But was it really the apocalypse? As someone who knew almost nothing about StarKid upon entering the venue that evening, I couldn’t be too sure. The thousands of screaming children, parents who weren’t sure how to deal with the noise, and stage filled with good-looking performers in complimentary costumes featuring varying levels of thigh exposure felt like some kind of terrifying trifecta that could only mean certain death.

Fortunately for the crowd (and to a lesser extent, me), the world did not end after Charlene left the stage, and the Apocalyptour continued as the remaining performers of StarKid began their show. The minimal and vaguely Incan set design was, like every other element of the show’s construction, merely a method of threading disconnected StarKid songs together. The show’s framing device featured them as archeologists who encounter an ancient god of “chaos, death and musical theater” hell-bent on destroying the world. To dissuade him, they perform selections from their repertoire, including pieces from A Very Potter Musical, Me and My Dick, and Starship. A set list that moves from songs about penises to ones about Hermione Granger is objectively weird, but the StarKids (all former students of the University of Michigan’s School of Music, Theater & Dance) have an impressive grip on writing and, though lyrically all over the place, that persistent musical theater tone helped tie every dick and Potter song together.
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