by (@zaragolden)

Will Smith Teams Up With His Old Buddy DJ Jazzy Jeff, Lays Down New Vocals For “Summertime Remix”

Looks like Will Smith is back to making moves on the mic. Ahead of Men In Black III‘s release, Will Smith gamely rapped the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air theme song along with an eager Graham Norton Show audience, and then he flexed a freestyle on 106 & Park. And you know what? He sounded pretty great! However, he explained that “There are too many people in my house making music right now,” dashing our hopes of a real return to rap.

And so The Fresh Prince returns instead with a remix of his still classic “Summertime.” The song leads the third installment of DJ Jazzy Jeff and Mick Boogie‘s Summertime mixtape series.

“A groove slightly transformed,” he rhymes over a drawn-out rework of the famous Kool & the Gang sampling-beat. Sounding his 43-years-old, he goes on to suggests that it might be “a little something to break the monotony of all that hard-core dance that’s gotten to be a bit out of control.” Funny how a line that’s over twenty years old can still resonate so strongly in present-day 2012. Read more…

by (@Lacezilla)

MTV Memories: How YO! MTV Raps First Made Hip Hop Mainstream

With MTV officially celebrating its 30th birthday today, music nostalgia is in the air. But for each music fan, the initial introduction to MTV’s music programming was unique and personal, and likely rouses up flashbulb memories to this very day. Speaking only for myself, that initiation process started with YO! MTV Raps.

After being on the air for almost seven years, MTV first aired YO! in April of 1988. While other television outlets like BET were showcasing African-American culture at the time, MTV, quite frankly, wasn’t really in the business of having black artists’ videos on the channel. And hip hop, specifically, was certainly not yet used as a vehicle of pop culture; if it wasn’t an indisputable, mainstream force like Michael Jackson, you probably wouldn’t see African-American artists on-air besides an occasional crossover video from Run DMC and Jazzy Jeff. Unless you witnessed hip hop music and culture bubbling within New York City’s five boroughs or other domestic regional pockets first hand (or watched Video Music Box), the genre probably hadn’t really made its way into your world yet.

From it’s inception, YO! MTV Raps curated an balance of hip hop via in-the-moment self-exploration. Since hosts Fab 5 Freddy, Doctor Dr? and Ed Lover didn’t have quite enough content to populate the show’s segments at first, videos from other genres like reggae, funk, R&B and soul were peppered-in to help hip hop’s still-developing definition expand its scope. From that fundamental, harmonious and educational coexistence came more of the same, and soon light-hearted videos like Digital Underground’s “Doowutchalike” and “Humpty Dance” were seamlessly airing beside Public Enemy’s political anthem “Fight The Power” and sonically dynamic “Passin’ Me By” from The Pharcyde, and the South’s sexually-charged posse 2 Live Crew were showcased just as much as funky artists from Queens like A Tribe Called Quest. Additionally, lyrically savvy Juice Crew member Big Daddy Kane would spin alongside the West Coast’s gangster juggernaut N.W.A., and strong female voices like Queen Latifah, MC Lyte and Roxanne Shant?: all women who didn’t need to sell sex to survive.

Read more…