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Surprisingly, Frank Ocean’s Cover Of Prince’s “When You Were Mine” Didn’t Result In Panties Thrown On Stage

Here’s something to make Frank Ocean fans a little jealous. Hey, we figured we shouldn’t be alone in our jealousy of everyone who attended Frank Ocean’s Wiltern performance in LA last night. For his hour long set he performed “Pyramids,” “Sweet Thing,” and “Super Rich Kids,” with a surprise cameo of Odd Future’s Earl Sweatshirt. Ocean also covered Prince‘s “When You Were Mine” for a crowd of screaming fans. When’s the last time someone did a cover to the genius that is Prince? Although OC Weekly critiqued Ocean’s stage presence for not being “lively” enough, the deafening screams of attendees paint another picture. Read more…

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Last Lap: Friday’s Odds And Ends In Music News



September 11: How Music Responded
Long Read of the Day: We wrote earlier today about the music that people listened to after the events of September 11 occurred, but before they had any effect on recordings. Over at MTV Hive, five pieces explore what those effects turned out to be for pop, country, indie rock, rap, and dance. [MTV Hive]

Coldplay Share Cover Art And Final Tracklisting For New Album
Coldplay posted the details for Mylo Xyloto, due out October 25, on their website this afternoon. Also, each track has its own little pictogram. (The symbol for “Every Teardrop Is A Waterfall”? A teardrop.) [Coldplay.com]
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Last Lap: Monday?s Odds And Ends In (Video) Music (Awards) News

One of the minor instant celebrities of last night’s Video Music Awards was Tyler, The Creator‘s mother, who sobbed with pride and excitement when her son won the Best New Artist Moonman. It turns out that her on-camera presence is due in part to an unlikely VMA hero: Nathan Williams of Wavves, who claims on Twitter to have given her his Black Carpet pass. Left Brain of Odd Future seems to confirm this on his Tumblr, describing Williams as “a crazy white kid,” and further noting that Williams “sparked a blunt when [Lil] Wayne was performing and Ron Artest told him to put it out!” All that, and the premiere of I Just Want My Pants Back! featured new Wavves song “I Wanna Meet Dave Grohl,” a wish that apparently came true at the VMAs. [Tumblr]

Not spotted at the VMAs: The Game, who came to the venue in downtown Los Angeles?but then decided to give his tickets away. [Twitter]
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Tyler, The Creator/Bruno Mars, Kreayshawn/Rick Ross Beefs Aired Out At 2011 Video Music Awards

Tyler the Creator reupped his distaste for Bruno Mars on the Black Carpet at the 2011 VMAs last night. Prompted by Jim Cantiello‘s observation that Tyler was last, behind even Bruno Mars, in VMA Twitter mentions, Tyler remarked, “I’m a f? I’m a failure,” adding, with a bit of hyperbole, “I’m gonna kill myself,” which was also his threat should “Grenade” win Video Of The Year (it didn’t). Why the continuing feud? “I really hate his music.”

He was forced to backpedal later in the show, after seeing Bruno Mars’s bravura performance in the tribute to Amy Winehouse. He tweeted, “F?k I hate Bruno, but that was really good.” Maybe this Odd Belieber will be won over yet.
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Five Fast Facts: Pitchfork Festival 2011

Sadly, we weren’t able to make it out to Chicago for this year’s Pitchfork Music Festival, but we were closely following along at home?a task made somewhat easier this year with (now-dead) livestreams of some bands’ sets?and we wanted to share the fruits of that labor with you. So here’s what you (and we) missed:

1. SAXOPHONES
By our count, there were three saxophonists onstage at the festival for this Summer of Sax: one as part of Destroyer‘s smooth-rock band, and two playing with Merrill Garbus of Tune-Yards. Those looking for a smooth sax solo could find it at Destroyer’s set, but the harmonic and punctuating use of saxophones was a highlight of Thursday’s Tune-Yards performance at Pier 54 in New York City, and judging from this clip of “Do You Want To Live?” Friday’s Pitchfork set was no different.
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Sara Quin of Tegan and Sara Weighs in on Odd Future, Misogyny, and Homophobia

The often misogynistic, homophobic combativeness of rap collective Odd Future continues to vex critics and artists alike. On Friday afternoon, Sara Quin of Tegan and Sara harshly castigated those who would praise Tyler, the Creator and/or misogynistic/homophobic music in general. Her short manifesto hints at a breadth and depth of thought on the subject of problematic art, as well as her own history in the music industry, though she unpacks little of what she suggests. She is particularly (and not necessarily unfairly) critical of what she sees as hypocrisy in the indie rock community (which, as Dr. Wendy Fonarow has argued, esteems itself as particularly forward-thinking): “The more I think about it, the more I think people don?t actually want to go up against this particular bully because he?s popular. Who sticks up for women and gay people now? It seems entirely uncool to do so in the indie rock world, and I?ll argue that point with ANYONE.” She also touches on issues that often get elided in these communities?those of race and of class (although her essay’s oblique implications about Odd Future’s class standing are belied by their fairly suburban upbringing).

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Tyler, The Creator’s Goblin and Hip Hop Homophobia

Raphael Saadiq, Christina Perri, and the Cars all released records this week, but for many teenage music fans, only one new record is worth talking about: Goblin by Tyler, the Creator, the relatively unknown rapper who’s the best of a pack of SoCal skater kids (Odd Future Wolf Gang Kill Them All) making deliberately confrontational music because they think it’s funny. The group’s famous fans include Adele and Mos Def. And they’ll happily call out those who aren’t paying attention: on his single “Yonkers,” Tyler claims he’ll “stab Bruno Mars in his g**damn esophagus,” prompting the You Oughta Know favorite to quip to Spin that he “has to wait in line if he wants to stab me.” All this attention has led some to question the shock value of the sometimes-violent rhymes, especially on the subjects of women and homosexuality.

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