by (@grahamorama)

SoundScanner: Can The Lumineers Reach The Top Of The Pop Charts?

lumineers-soundscanner

Sadly, the answer to that question is “No.” Or, if you’re an optimist, “Not yet!” Country singer Gary Allan stormed the album charts at No. 1 this week, while You Oughta Know alumni the Lumineers are clapping and stomping right behind him at No. 2. Here’s a look at this week’s Nielsen SoundScan sales figures:

“HO HEY,” LET’S GO: The self-titled debut album from folky jangle-pop upstarts the Lumineers hits No. 2 on this week’s chart, a new high for the Denver trio. The sons of Mumford‘s performance on the Jan. 19 SNL certainly didn’t hurt, nor did “Ho Hey”’s prominence in all those Silver Linings Playbook TV ads. The band is up for Best New Artist at next month’s Grammy Awards, and they also landed a prime slot on this year’s Coachella bill. Meanwhile, “Ho Hey” has now crossed the 3 million sales mark, after selling 141,000 digital copies this week (good for #3 on the singles chart). No matter how big they get, we’ll always remember when they came by our office last summer for a You Oughta Know Live set.

SINK “FRIDAY”: While the beef between Mariah Carey and Nicki Minaj continues to be this year’s most propulsive American Idol narrative, it hasn’t done anything for Ms. Minaj’s sales. Her second album Pink Friday: Roman Reloaded freefalls 29 spots on this week’s chart to No. 115, after falling seven spots the week prior. The set has sold 805,000 copies to date, which is certainly nothing to scoff at, but hearing Nicki bicker with Mimi hasn’t exactly sent new fans running to the stores to pick up her album. Neither Carey nor auxiliary judge Keith Urban —we keep forgetting he’s even on the show!— have current products they’re pushing, so their Idol sales impact has yet to be felt.

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by (@zaragolden)

Rodriguez, The Rock Star Who Didn’t Know It, Talks His Life Without Fame With 60 Mintues

Last night on 60 Minutes, shone their spotlight on one of rock and roll’s most mysterious and rewarding stories: the rock icon who didn’t know it, Rodriguez. Rodriguez spun out two records in rapid succession — Cold Fact in 1970 and Coming From Reality in 1971 — and when neither hit, he retired to a life of day laboring in his native Detroit. Meanwhile, his yarns about inner-city struggle and anti-establishment took hold in South Africa, where his music resonated particularly with the rising anti-apartheid movement and where it was assumed he was dead. And so unassuming all the while, he was more popular than The Beatles and Elvis halfway around the world, because “Well, I just wasn’t meant to be so lucky … then,” he says. Read more…