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June Playlist: The Best Jams From Your Fave VH1 Shows

At VH1, countless hours are spent determining what music best complements our shows. This past month was no different as VH1′s CMI team worked to synch the best tracks to shows like Mob Wives Chicago and Single Ladies 2, tunes that added an extra spark to the drama onscreen. We thought it would be neat to give you an inside look into this world of music supervision.

To this end, we’ve put together a list of all the songs featured on our network in June — from artists like Timomatic, Emeli Sande, and up-and-comer Elle King. Additionally, we’ve included commentary from CMI team members as to why they selected songs for particular scenes as well as a Spotify playlist for you to sample. Enjoy, and look out for our July playlist!

VH1 SHOWS PLAYLIST: JUNE 2012

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by (@unclegrambo)

Tuned In: Lionel Richie Shares His Dream (His Awesome Dream) To Go Country On Letterman With “Say You, Say Me”

The true test of determining which songs will stand the test of time is their adaptability. If you were to change the arrangement —or even the genre— of a given song, does it still resonate with audiences? Lionel Richie took the stage at the Ed Sullivan Theater last night with country music superstar Jason Aldean to prove that his 1985 smash, “Say You, Say Me” is one of the all-time greats by giving it a countryfied spin. The song went all the way to #1 on both the Billboard Hot 100 and R&B charts when it was originally released, and even took home an Oscar for Best Original Song, and hasn’t aged a bit in 25 years.

This track, along with other Richie classics like “Stuck On You” and “Endless Love”, appear on Richie’s new jawn, Tuskegee. This is not a greatest hits record, though — Richie has gone back into the studio and put a twangy, country spin on the most beloved songs in his catalog. Thanks to the undeniably ace songwriting skills, this LP doesn’t feel like a shameless attempt to pander to Nashville audiences (who still buy albums in droves) like recent crossover attempts from the likes of Jessica Simpson and Jon Bon Jovi. Richie has experimented with many musical styles in his nearly 40-year career, from funk to pop to R&B, so this album feels more like a natural evolution and less like a calculated attempt to line his coiffers. Good on ya, LR!

Elsewhere in late night…
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