by (@BHSmithNYC)

Rock’s 15 Most Face Melting Bass Solos In Honor Of John Entwistle’s Birthday

basssoloMain
Today would have been the 70th birthday of John Entwistle, the groundbreaking bass guitarist for legendary classic rockers The Who who died in 2002. Entwistle redefined the role of the bass in rock music and changed the way the instrument sounded and was played. His lead breaks on the band’s 1965 anthem “My Generation” may or may not be the first bass solo on a rock n’ roll record, however it is the most well known and possibly the best. And though it took a couple years to catch up, others soon followed suit, inspired by “The Ox”’s aggressive playing style and impressive musicianship. From fellow travellers like Jack Bruce and Tim Bogart through to present day bass ragers Billy Sheehan and Les Claypool, thanks to Entwistle’s innovations the bass guitar is no longer banished to the back of the bandstand. Celebrate John Entwistle’s birthday today and check 15 of the greatest bass guitar solos in rock history.

Read more…

by (@BHSmithNYC)

Fisticuffs, Cricket Bat Attacks And 10 Bands That Came To Blows To Settle Their Differences

bandsblowsM
Since Elvis Presley sneered not to mess with his “Blue Suede Shoes,” fighting and rock n’ roll have gone together like whiskey and a beer chaser. The music’s natural tendency towards rebellion and bravado demand almost make it mandatory. Some bands are known for feuding with other musicians, some for getting into fisticuffs with audience members and then there are those who take inter-band squabbles into the physical arena and settling their differences, artistic or otherwise, with their mitts. Read more…

by (@BHSmithNYC)

Human Riffs: Who Are Rock’s 10 Greatest Rhythm Guitar Players?

RhythmGitsM
The sound of rock n’ roll, whether it be heavy metal, classic rock or punk, is the sound of the electric guitar. And while the lead players of the world get the groupies, I mean, glory, it’s the rhythm guitarists who make the whole thing work, and rock, in the first place. Without a great song, anchored around a surging riff or bashed out chord progression, even the greatest guitar solo in the world is just meaningless noodling. With that in mind we decided to count down 10 of the greatest rhythm guitar players in rock history. Read more…

by (@JordanRuntagh)

Who’s Last: Roger Daltrey On New Music, Final Tours, And 50 Years Of The Who

roger_daltrey_50th_main

Roger Daltrey is definitely busier than you. Despite having just turned 70, the legendary frontman of The Who is still ambitious, still rebellious, and still the King of the Rock ‘n’ Roll Scream. This April marks 50 years since Keith Moon (Patent British Exploding Drummer) joined forces with the band, completing the lineup that made them unstoppable. Even though the tragic deaths of Moon and thundering bassist John Entwistle have reduced the original four to two, Daltrey and guitarist Pete Townshend are still out on the road, defending their title of Rock’s Best (and loudest) Live Act -until now.

Read more…

by (@BHSmithNYC)

The Who’s Roger Daltrey Turns 70! Hear His 7 Greatest Screams!

ROGER_70TH_ART
They say March roars in like a lion so it’s only fitting that today, March 1st, happens to be the 70th birthday of the lion-manned singer of one of rock’s greatest bands and possessor of one of music’s greatest roars, Roger Daltrey of The Who.  Whether as a young, hard-nosed mod, the many-curled icon of the Tommy musical or the tight-shirted, muscular arena rocker, the singer is known for belting out some of the most throat-shredding known screams in hard rock history. And while the years of larynx abuse have brought his range down some recently, anyone who’s seen The Who live in the past couple years, knows he’s still a riveting frontman and powerful vocalist.  So in honor of his 7 decades on thie planet, check out 7 of Roger Daltrey’s greatest screams! Read more…

by (@JordanRuntagh)

Celebrate Jimmy Page’s 70th Birthday With His 20 Greatest Pre-Zeppelin Session Guitarist Tracks

JIMMY_PAGE_SESSION_PLAYER_ART_MAIN

70 years ago today, James Patrick Page was born into this world…and rock has never been the same. His name would be secure in the history books even if he only penned “Stairway To Heaven”, but that’s just the first step on the journey to appreciating Jimmy Page‘s guitar brilliance. Long before selling out stadiums in the seventies with Led Zeppelin, Page had already made a name for himself a decade earlier as one of the most sought after session musicians in Britian. He played on literally hundreds (if not thousands) of records from 1963 to 1966, admitting in later years that “At one point I was playing on three sessions a day, six days a week.” Known for his diversity as well as his virtuosity, these tracks ran the gamut from hard-edged R&B, easy-listening Burt Bacharach standards, and Top 40 pop like “Downtown” by Petula Clark, “It’s Not Unusual” by Tom Jones, and even the James Bond theme “Goldfinger”! Of course, he also played for future legends like the Who, the Kinks, Van Morrison and David Bowie

Page did so many dates that even he has difficulty recalling exactly what he did and who he did it for. As a result, his session-man days have taken on an almost mythical quality, leading diehard fans to endlessly debate which songs have been graced by Jimmy’s strings. In honor of the man’s 70th birthday, we’ve done our very best to separate fact from fiction and sift through hundreds of tracks to bring you our picks for his most badass session work ever. It’s a mix of incredible yet little-heard deep cuts, and beloved classics you probably never knew he had a hand in creating. Read on and rock on, friends!

Read more…

by (@JordanRuntagh)

Bands Gone Wild: 10 Outrageous Rock Performances Caught On Live TV

Bands Going Wild On Live TV

Rock ‘n’ roll is built on uncontrolled rebellion, passion, and spontaneity. So in other words, it’s not really made for the confines of live television. And that’s what makes it so great when bands perform live on the small screen…you never know WHAT kind of madness might happen! Check out the 10 most outrageous live TV performances in rock history.

Read more…

by (@Lacezilla)

Kanye’s 12.12.12 Set Makes Us Very, Very Sad For Him, and For Hip Hop

Hip hop caught a really big L at last night’s 12.12.12 Concert For Sandy Relief. In a perfect world, where music fans’ interests were in harmonious alignment, Kanye West performing between The Who and Billy Joel would have been a well-received and seamless transition. In reality, however, Yeezy seemed to hit wall with the big-ticket 12.12.12 audience, performing a set that — for an artist known for cultivating fan enthusiam at his shows — was not only incapable of fully forming a connection, but also appeared to drain Kanye and chip away at his normal passionate delivery. There solely to raise money for victims of Hurricane Sandy, it soon became clear that the G.O.O.D. Music capo was frustrated with the room.

Back in February, Kanye’s big brother Jay-Z hosted two consecutive nights in New York City’s distinguished Carnegie Hall. Bringing out the city’s uppercrust, Beyonce’s husband joined hands with the United Way and sold out both shows to raise money for a cause of his own, the Shawn Carter Foundation. But last night was different. The baby boomer crowd at MSG didn’t buy tickets to see Kanye West like folks did for Hov at Carnegie — they came to bathe in the nostalgia of beloved rock acts that they’ve been playing for decades. Unfortunately for Kanye, the booking itself was a recipe for rejection.

Read more…