Celebrity Plastic Surgeon Explains Kylie Jenner’s Lips and How Stars Get Red Carpet Ready

The truth is revealed.

Kylie Jenner’s face has drastically changed in recent years. And after publicly denying plastic surgery rumors, we need to figure out what was really going on.

“I just don’t really see how that could be a very impressive makeup job,” says New York-based facial plastic surgeon Dr. Philip Miller. “It’s certainly within the realm of what fillers could do, although if it is, within seven months you should see them actually getting smaller unless she continues to get more and more injections. If it’s an implant, you won’t see much change at all unless there is some type of complication associated with the implant, which would require her to have it removed.”

In addition to his take on Jenner, the celebrity doctor gave us details on the go-to procedures stars request leading up to a red carpet event and what kind of treatment will help you look like your favorite celeb.

What is the most popular procedure among celebrities?
Dr. Philip Miller: Botox and fillers by far.

Do you often get last minute requests before big events?
It can’t be too last minute because Botox requires 12 hours to seven days for it to kick in. But fillers are immediate in their lips and cheeks, so that can be last minute.

What are some current Hollywood fads?
Non-invasive treatments. You don’t need any anesthesia to get it, and it tightens the skin [and] neck. Botox or any of the fillers are huge and they can be done from ages 25 to 65. The minimally invasive type of micro-lifts, where incisions are made in and around the ear and under the skin so you look as good as you do with a ponytail, are also very popular.

Would you consider yourself as a part of a celebrity’s team?
Yes.

What are some misconceptions about plastic surgery?
That it’s fake, unsafe, readily noticeable. You can look refreshed, less tired, and happier, but they won’t necessarily recognize it as being due to plastic surgery, if done correctly. Even a drastic change, you’d be amazed at how many people do not recognize that. [Another] is that it’s only for older individuals. We don’t operate on age, we operate on findings.

If I were to get something done at age 18, what would that look like 20 to 30 years down the line?
It all depends on what you do and where you do it and who does it. You can have the fillers put into the lips, for example, and within a year, they’re gone. Literally with no residual effect at all. You can put permanent fillers in your lips, and while it may look great for years, even forever, there are times when permanent injectable material all of a sudden grows 20 years later and you get these horribly misshapen overly swollen lips that have to be surgically corrected. So it really ranges.

Do you think Kylie Jenner has had lip injections?
It’s certainly within the realm of what fillers could do. Although if it is, within seven months you should see them actually getting smaller unless she continues to get more and more injections. If it’s an implant, you won’t see much change at all unless there is some type of complication associated with the implant, which would require her to have it be removed. I don’t really see how that could be a very impressive makeup job.

Dr. Phillip Miller

What do you actually inject when doing fillers?
In lips, fillers last around seven months or so. Permanent injections or fillers [use] silicone injections and fat. Fat is taken from the belly or elsewhere and then injected into the lips.

What are some of the major differences in plastic surgery now from 25 years ago
The pervasiveness, how frequently people get it and talk about it, the age difference — because younger people are getting it. There are non-pervasive treatments now to prevent you from aging and more men are getting more plastic surgery as well.

Price range?
A nose job is between seven and $15,000. Botox is $10-15 per unit, with the average person using 25 units. It last around four months and most people come back between every four to six months. A face lift ranges from $10 to 30,000 and lip injections: can be $200 to $1500 — it all depends on how much you’re injecting.

Does age come into play in your decision making?
There are several considerations before you proceed to operate on someone. The first is whether or not they’re done growing, and the second is maturity. Are they ready to accept the change in their physical appearance and do they have realistic expectations in their results? As a surgeon, if I don’t think I can meet your expectations, then I’m doing an extreme disservice by operating on you.

How do you respond to those who say your profession negatively affects self-image?
I think our entire society has a huge stress towards beauty and appearance. But if you’re objective and you look at who’s on television, in the movies, and who’s a phenomenal actor, I don’t know if you’d necessarily qualify them as the most attractive people in the world.

Are there any surgeries you won’t do?
Absolutely. I did have a celebrity begging for me to do a procedure that I would absolutely, positively not do. It was not even a named operation, it was more of a request to remove tissue on a portion of their face so that another portion of their face would look better, leaving them with an enormous scar in the area. They promised me that they wouldn’t be upset, and in that situation I had to be the wiser of the two of us and say, “I won’t do that.” People will come to me and ask for operations when they’re looking for a result I can’t give them. Or the result that they want, I’d perform if I had poor taste, but it isn’t an aesthetic I want associated with my name. I’m very honest with the patient.

What are options for those who want to get procedures like a celebrity, but don’t want to break the bank?
There’s really not that much difference between a celebrity and anyone else in the public eye. I treat a lot of Wall Street individuals, a lot of CEOs, and they all want to heal quickly. I would put [celebrities] in one specific category: they have certain fundamental features that they may not be aware of and that classifies them as being who they are. If they wanted me to change those features I would strongly advise them not to have them change. It may look better on someone that is not famous, but that individual is now affiliated with that particular feature. If you change that feature, you’re going to change who they are.

Pizza is bae. And yes, I still say bae.
@taylorferber